Tag Archives: Ayala Ave.

Gain and Simple: Simple Lang

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Tempted to entitle this “Pain and Simple”, I had to stop myself before I give you the wrong impression about the place.

Yes, I was in pain when we ate at Simple Lang, but no, the food did not cause the malady. I was in pain before I learned that we were having dinner in this strangely named place, and with the power of Salonpas and friendly company, I enjoyed dinner rather pain-free.

Simple Lang (Ayala Triangle) is truly named such, and it is rather difficult to type this as my fingers default to the small “L” for lang—if you know what I mean. “Simple Lang” is best translated as “It’s simple”pertaining to the simplicity of the food or perhaps imbibing the comfort food aspect of Filipino favorites.

 

Well, whatever the case may be, there is nothing simple about it or its menu items. Simple is fried fish or grilled squid, but here, we get fancily named items with equally superb plating—and I can’t complain about that! I would just abhor the idea of walking all the way to Ayala Triangle just to get a dose of fried tilapia, which in all honesty and simplicity, I detest.

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To start off, we had Crispy Ukoy and Green Mango because it had that promising Thai twist. Also, most appetizers had meat in them or had exotic specimens I was not interested in at the moment (Gising Gising, Laing or Alugbati—please do not ask for a translation!) The Ukoy was a tad too hard, we feared it would further displace my already painful shoulder. I managed to shove big chunks in my mouth and let my teeth suffer instead.

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The MBT – Monggo Bagnet Tinapa was customized for my dietary preference, placing the “B” (bagnet) on the side. The result was a creamy and heartwarming monggo soup with slightly bitter tinapa flakes. The bagnet-on-the-side became an added viand—a win-win idea!

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The Super Pla Pla came in its gigantic fried glory. It was a leviathan beast with less fish meat than expected. Most of the mass went to the deep fried enlargement (aka pinaputok or “burst”) which translates to ummm… crisp air! The “buro” (sauce) on the side formed a love affair with my peers, but the evident rice grains scared me away. More for them! All I wanted was to pinch the pla pla until extinction—no buro required for me!

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The Calamansi Honey Fried Chicken (sorry, blurred!) was typical in taste and more honey than calamansi (sour). The fried garlic did wonders to this otherwise greasy dish, but I would suppose for the Filipino variety—toyomansi-based fried chicken will always be the supreme flavour! Add more garlic and forget buro!

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All those fried and flavourful viands only contributed to a sweet yet light craving. Ice cream and cheesecake were crossed off the list since Banapple was infinitely filled so we settled with the in-house Turon Bites. This was partly due to our noisy table neighbours who must have not seen one another in 10 years. Boisterous as hell, we couldn’t help but stare at their table every second or so and spotted those pointy sticks!

The turon bites were simply fried banana and mantou morsels drizzled with condensed milk. The barbecue sticks added to the novelty, and the milky bread, I had to forego. The banana bites were enough for me!

Simple Lang attempts to mend my long lost love for Filipino food. It did part of the deal by getting me to eat (with seconds) the monggo soup sans the bagnet. There is still that greasy after-taste that comes with most dishes, so my best refuge would be a long walk or a cup of tea afterward.

Still, with other choices in the Ayala area, there will be other cravings—maybe for more turon?

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